DIAMOND
RATING
Senteo Rating 2.5
04/27/23
views 3912
comments0
Author:Martin Lindstrom
04/27/23
views 3913
comments0
Author:Martin Lindstrom
DIAMOND
RATING
Senteo Rating 2.5

Brandwashed
Martin Lindstrom, Crown Business, 2011
Senteo’s Review information

How do you decide on purchasing a product that catches your eye? Is it the subtle contours of the packaging or the bright colors that sell the product to you? Will the quality win you over, or will it be what the product and company represents? These and a thousand other questions assault marketers every day, and while it may seem trivial to a typical consumer, marketers address these questions to make their products fit for marketing to the audience.
Martin Lindstrom turns the tables on the marketing industry and jumps ship, detailing some of the very questions that marketers pour over when they redesign a campaign. Brandwashing is his brainchild and follows Buyology, his first bestseller on the topic of why we buy the things that we do. Marketing, a business that is discussed behind boardroom doors and only to the most necessary of ears, is brought to light as Martin addresses what exactly is discussed in the secret branding meetings and executive discussions. Here, Martin shows us just how a brand can brainwash us.

There were two chapters in particular that leapt from the page and caught our eye: “Oh, Sweet Memories” and “Hope in a Jar.” These chapters focus on two key topics that Senteo emphasizes in its methodology, namely because they target emotions and attachment that otherwise falls by the wayside for many marketing campaigns. Martin makes it clear that we are attached to, and unknowingly drawn to, things that remind us of our past and positive memories – a concept that is mirrored in industries such as real estate (smelling fresh baked cookies in an open house), grocery stores (seeing wood crates with hand-drawn signs), and television (using black-and-white cinematography). Additionally, “Hope in a Jar” provides us with how we, as a human society, are so molded by expectation and hope that we are willing to reach for things that have a significant impact on our mood and outlook on life. Essentially, we look to products to fulfill what we desire, what we expect, or what we hope for, and this is not unlike what a bank should be striving to achieve. As a business, it should meet the expectations of individuals while still offering more so that they are wholly satisfied.

To a lesser, but nonetheless important, extent, the chapter “Under Pressure” also catches our eye due to its focus on peer influence. To further investigate this topic, however, we would suggest reading The Ultimate Question 2.0, one of our favorite recommended reading materials.

What we felt that Brandwashed was lacking was the concrete evidence that would solidify Martin’s findings and claims. Much of what is stated is referenced, yet lacks any hard data that can show the effectiveness of the concepts. In particular, we noticed that while we agreed with some of the claims, we could not say that our agreement would be shared by a considerable number of people – there simply is not enough evidence to support this. The material is interesting, yet is not substantially different than what can be glazed from simple observation or elementary marketing techniques. Yes, there is more depth to the book than what a glance into the industry can offer, but it is not significant enough to warrant a full book on the topic, especially with Buyology targeting much of the content as well. What we were looking for was a book with genuine insight into the world of marketing, but what we received was a book that spent half its time covering the basics and the other half touching on new, interesting topics.

Marketing visionary Martin Lindstrom has been on the front lines of the branding wars for over twenty years. Here, he turns the spotlight on his own industry, drawing on all he has witnessed behind closed doors, exposing for the first time the full extent of the psychological tricks and traps that companies devise to win our hard-earned dollars.

Picking up from where Vance Packard’s bestselling classic, The Hidden Persuaders, left off more than half-a-century ago, Lindstrom reveals:

  • New findings that reveal how advertisers and marketers intentionally target children at an alarmingly young age – starting when they are still in the womb!
  • Shocking results of an fMRI study which uncovered what heterosexual men really think about when they see sexually provocative advertising (hint: it isn’t their girlfriends).
  • How marketers and retailers stoke the flames of public panic and capitalize on paranoia over global contagions, extreme weather events, and food contamination scares.
  • The first ever neuroscientific evidence proving how addicted we all are to our iPhones and our Blackberry’s (and the shocking reality of cell phone addiction – it can be harder to shake than addictions to drugs and alcohol).
  • How companies of all stripes are secretly mining our digital footprints to uncover some of the most intimate details of our private lives, then using that information to target us with ads and offers ‘perfectly tailored’ to our psychological profiles.
  • How certain companies, like the maker of one popular lip balm, purposely adjust their formulas in order to make their products chemically addictive.
  • What a 3-month long guerilla marketing experiment, conducted specifically for this book, tells us about the most powerful hidden persuader of them all.
  • And much, much more.

This searing expose introduces a new class of tricks, techniques, and seductions – the Hidden Persuaders of the 21st century- and shows why they are more insidious and pervasive than ever.

Brandwashed is a book that is easy to read and interesting for the average consumer as well as the learned businesses executive. The book itself has been praised by people who span the gamut from Regular Joe to Tyra Banks, and that just shows how open and interesting the information can be. The book gives wonderful insight into the basics and major questions of marketing, but the real value comes when those concepts are placed in the hands of a businessperson who is looking to grow their brand or a marketer looking for new techniques to pursue. While there is no application methods in the book, there is ample room for a creative mind to apply what the book contains to a new venture or even a current business to improve the memorability and appeal of a brand.

Senteo Subject Category
Senteo

Martin is an expert on the subject of marketing, and make no mistake, he puts all of his knowledge of the subject onto the pages of his book. Knowledge, however, does not grant us the insight into how we should better market our brands, so Brandwashing exists solely as a collection of research and ideas. We can read it, we can internalize the information, but we must then put in the work ourselves to make the concepts real and actionable.

The best book reviews in your inbox!
Subscribe now and receive a special gift with your subscription.


    Leave a Reply

    Brandwashed
    Martin Lindstrom, Crown Business, 2011
    Have you already read this book?
    Here, are people invited to rate the book?

    How useful was this post?

    Click on a star to rate it!

    Average rating / 5. Vote count:

    No votes so far! Be the first to rate this book.

    See content on this topic

    Banks have long struggled to adequately match customer expectations. So how can banks give customers what they really want? Michael Ruckman explains how to build and maintain real relationships.
    Voice On Demand Retail Podcast: Part 1 – Customer Experience & Journeys
    Michael Ruckman talks about Customer Experiences & Customer Journeys, The three faces of Digital for Retailers and the state of leadership in the retail market today.
    Voice On Demand Retail Podcast: Part 2 – The three faces of Digital for Retailers
    Michael Ruckman talks about Customer Experiences & Customer Journeys, The three faces of Digital for Retailers and the state of leadership in the retail market today.
    Michael Ruckman Talks about Customer-Centric Business Models
    What is the difference between retention and loyalty, and between customer-centric and relationship-centric business models? How exactly can one monetize customer experience? Michael Ruckman answers these questions and more…
    What is Relationship-Centricity?
    This short video explains what relationship-centricity is and how it is different from customer-centricity. Follow the link to see how companies can extract value from their relationships with
    How to Build a Business That Lasts 100 Years
    Join strategist Martin Reeves as he explains how executives can apply six principles from living organisms to build resilient businesses that flourish in the face of change.
    Build a Tower, Build a Team
    Tom Wujec from Autodesk presents some surprisingly deep research into the “marshmallow problem” — a simple team-building exercise that involves dry spaghetti, one yard of tape and a marshmallow.
    What is Relationship-Centricity?
    This short video explains what relationship-centricity is and how it is different from customer-centricity. Follow the link to see how companies can extract value from their relationships with
    How to Build a Business That Lasts 100 Years
    Join strategist Martin Reeves as he explains how executives can apply six principles from living organisms to build resilient businesses that flourish in the face of change.
    Senteo Rating
    Gamify: How Gamification Motivates People to Do Extraordinary Things
    Senteo Rating
    Next Is Now: 5 Steps for Embracing Change—Building a Business that Thrives into the Future
    Related Book Reviews & Education
    The author provides a behavioral psychology perspective on shopping and lessons for success in retail, including an updated section on the internet and the global consumer.
    JC Quintana attempts to highlight the importance of focusing on building relationships in business. He highlights 7 key elements that are paramount in making up successful business relationships.
    Organizational health is key to business success; Lencioni guides leaders in fostering a cohesive, clear, well-communicated, and reinforced working environment to achieve sustainable success.
    David J. Friedman introduces a systematic approach to creating an intentional, high-performance culture that drives organizational success.