Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t

DIAMOND
RATING
Senteo Rating 4
04/27/23
views 14671
comments0
Author:Simon Sinek
04/27/23
views 14672
comments0
Author:Simon Sinek
DIAMOND
RATING
Senteo Rating 4

Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t
Simon Sinek, Portfolio 2014
Senteo’s Review information

In this book Simon Sinek explores the concept of leadership and provides a fundamental framework for what he believes makes a good leader. His focus within the book comes down to the basic differential between a good leader and a bad one which he supports using evidence in the form of examples from both categories. His message is similar to the one unpacked in the Infinite Game where he discusses the mindset with which leaders should lead. Sinek is a British born American author and motivational speaker who has published five books, he is a New York times bestselling author and has appeared on TED a multitude of times. He attended the University of London. Sinek stays true to his core values and beliefs in what leaders are supposed to do for their subordinates and followers. The key points from the book include the fact that Sinek believes true leaders need to prioritize the needs of the group over their own which therefor ensures that the group progresses as a whole. Furthermore, because a leader’s vision is a cause for action, he highlights the importance of following and being a leader for good. Sinek also emphasizes the importance of focusing on a vision for the future, instead of focusing on short-term goals. This is a belief echoed from The Infinite Game. The reason Sinek chose the title Leaders Eat Last is from an example of leadership in the Marine Corps which he finds commendable. It is quite literally a custom that by pure self-motivation, senior members in the Marine Corps, always insist on taking their meals last, making the statement: leaders eat last.

Once again it is important to emphasize that Sinek is an empowering speaker and writer who has a way of captivating his audience like no other. Leaders Eat Last is no exception to this rule where he provides a clear concise line of thinking for why he believes in his thesis, and then he goes on to support his idea with relatable and emotionally empowering examples which resonate with the reader. His philosophies make you feel good while you’re reading them and let your mind wander into worlds which are led by compassionate kind leaders which makes you feel good and hopeful.

If you have read is more recent work, such as The Infinite Game, this book is somewhat redundant due to the similarity in topics and theory covered. If this is your first Simon Sinek book, it is important to understand The issues that plague most of his books are an evident issue here wherein he uses cherry picked examples of leadership which fit his theory, but never addresses cases in which leaders were successful in empowering their base, but weren’t the compassionate type. Case in point, President Trump is everything which Sinek believes embodies a bad leader, and he very well may be right, but it doesn’t displace the fact that he has followers which will go to the ends of the earth for him. Why is that?

Imagine a world where almost everyone wakes up inspired to go to work, feels trusted and valued during the day, then returns home feeling fulfilled. This is not a crazy, idealized notion. Today, in many successful organizations, great leaders create environments in which people naturally work together to do remarkable things.

In his work with organizations around the world, Simon Sinek noticed that some teams trust each other so deeply that they would literally put their lives on the line for each other. Other teams, no matter what incentives are offered, are doomed to infighting, fragmentation and failure. Why?

The answer became clear during a conversation with a Marine Corps general. “Officers eat last,” he said. Sinek watched as the most junior Marines ate first while the most senior Marines took their place at the back of the line. What’s symbolic in the chow hall is deadly serious on the battlefield: Great leaders sacrifice their own comfort–even their own survival–for the good of those in their care.

Too many workplaces are driven by cynicism, paranoia, and self-interest. But the best ones foster trust and cooperation because their leaders build what Sinek calls a “Circle of Safety” that separates the security inside the team from the challenges outside.

Sinek illustrates his ideas with fascinating true stories that range from the military to big business, from government to investment banking.

Sinek has a beautifully inspired methodology and presents it to us in detailed and convincing story line. If you haven’t read any of Sinek’s books, we highly recommended them. They are passionately written and are wonderful pieces for personal growth. If you have read his newer work The Infinite Game, then it’s important to note that this one tackles his methodology from a different perspective, but content wise there aren’t many new ideas. Nevertheless, if you are in a leadership position, or aspiring to become a leader his framework and methodology is invaluable to understand inside and out because we truly believe that leaders would benefit from using at least parts of it.

Senteo Subject Category
Senteo
The best book reviews in your inbox!
Subscribe now and receive a special gift with your subscription.


    Leave a Reply

    Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t
    Simon Sinek, Portfolio 2014
    Have you already read this book?
    Here, are people invited to rate the book?

    How useful was this post?

    Click on a star to rate it!

    Average rating / 5. Vote count:

    No votes so far! Be the first to rate this book.

    See content on this topic

    Development cycles, customer-centric business models, corporate culture and other topics discussed with the local press during a trip to Kyrgyzstan and a workshop with Bai Tushum Bank in Bishkek.
    Michael Ruckman Talks about Customer-Centric Business Models
    What is the difference between retention and loyalty, and between customer-centric and relationship-centric business models? How exactly can one monetize customer experience? Michael Ruckman answers these questions and more…
    Voice On Demand Retail Podcast: Part 2 – The three faces of Digital for Retailers
    Michael Ruckman talks about Customer Experiences & Customer Journeys, The three faces of Digital for Retailers and the state of leadership in the retail market today.
    How to Build a Business That Lasts 100 Years
    Join strategist Martin Reeves as he explains how executives can apply six principles from living organisms to build resilient businesses that flourish in the face of change.
    Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone To Take Action
    Simon Sinek explains that starting with ‘why’, having a strong driving motivation behind the work you do, can be the deciding factor between success and failure for a business venture.
    Senteo Rating
    No Rules Rules: Netflix and the Culture of Reinvention
    Senteo Rating
    Outliers
    Related Book Reviews & Education
    The authors provide a comprehensive overview of the customer experience, drawing on previous relevant works and providing a detailed and well-written guidebook for business practitioners interested in the subject.
    What Women Want focuses on the female shopper and her growing presence in the global marketplace, identifying just exactly what constitutes the personality and needs of the modern woman shopper.
    Author Paul Gibbons explores organizational change from the “modern” perspective, incorporating mindfulness, behavioral economics, sociology, and complexity theory. Paul Gibbons is a former investment banker, consultant, professor, and CEO.
    A guide to marketing in the digital age, focusing on how to build a marketing strategy in a world where consumers are constantly bombarded with communications and have learned to tune out the ad-saturation which has engulfed consumers over the last two decades.